What is Tick-Borne Encephalitis?
what-is-tbe
What is Tick-Borne Encephalitis?
Know the Facts to Help Keep Yourself Protected from TBE
It Can Take Just One Bite
Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is a rare viral infection of the brain and spine.1 Transmission of the TBE virus to humans most commonly occurs from the bite of an infected tick.2 Encephalitis means inflammation of the brain.3
What You Should Know
Know Facts #1

#1

Ticks infected with the
​​​​​​​TBE virus are not confined
​​​​​​​to one country
, with
reports of infected ticks in over
30 countries across Europe
​​​​​​​to Asia.2,4

Know facts #2

#2

Ticks are typically active from April through November.4 However, tick season can vary each year depending on the climate.1,5

Know facts #3

#3

There is no cure for TBE, and it cannot be treated with antibiotics or any other medication.​​​​​​​2,6

Know facts #4

#4

For those suffering from severe disease, 30-60% may develop long-term consequences.7​​​​​​​

What You Should Know
globe
#1
Ticks infected with the TBE virus are not confined to one country, with reports of infected ticks in over 30 countries across Europe to Asia.2,4
temperature
#2
Ticks are typically active when temperatures are above 42 oF, usually from April to November.4 However, tick season can vary each year depending on the climate.
no-cure
#3
There is no cure for TBE, and it cannot be treated with antibiotics or any other medication.2,6
patients
#4
For those suffering from severe disease, 30-60% may develop longterm consequences.9​​​​​​​​​​​​​​
Complications from TBE include:
  • Disorders that affect coordination, balance, and speech4
  • Cognitive changes: memory loss, inability to concentrate, and mood change8
  • Muscle weakness or permanent paralysis8
  • Temporary or long-term loss of consciousness8​​​​​​​
  • In very rare cases and depending on the subtype of infection, death may occur.7
Help Protect Yourself!
Signs & Symptoms
Most people infected with the TBE virus have no symptoms.4 But if symptoms occur, they usually appear in two phases.4 In the initial phase, people experience flu-like symptoms.7 Some people experience the second phase, which can be serious with symptoms similar to other causes of inflammation of the brain and spine or meningitis.7
Common symptoms across phases9:
Headache
Headache
fatigue
Fatigue
Muscule-pain
Muscle Pain
High-fever
High Fever 
(around 102 oF)
Nausae
Nausea
Vomiting
Vomiting
vertigo
Vertigo
References
  1. Lindquist L, Vapalahti O. Tick-borne encephalitis. Lancet. 2008;371(9627):1861-1871. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(08)60800-4
  2. Dobler G, Erber W, Bröker M, Schmitt HJ, eds. The TBE Book. 4th ed. Global Health Press; 2021.
  3. Mayo Clinic. Diseases & Conditions. Encephalitis. Accessed February 24, 2022. https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/ encephalitis/symptoms-causes/syc-20356136.
  4. Fischer M, Gould CV, Rollin PE. Tickborne Encephalitis. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC Yellow Book 2020: Health Information for International Travel. New York: Oxford University Press;2017. Chap 4. Accessed February 24, 2022. https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/yellowbook/2020/travel-related-infectious-diseases/tickborne-encephalitis.
  5. Bogovic P, Strle F. Tick-borne encephalitis: A review of epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and management. World J Clin Cases. 2015;3(5):430-441. doi:10.12998/wjcc.v3.i5.430.
  6. TicoVacTM (Tick-Borne Encephalitis Vaccine). Prescribing Information. New York, NY: Pfizer Inc. 2021.
  7. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) Factsheet. Accessed February 24, 2022. https://www.cdc.gov/vhf/tbe/resources/TBE-FactSheet.pdf.
  8. Haglund M, Günther G. Tick-borne encephalitis—pathogenesis, clinical course and long-term follow-up. Vaccine. 2003;21(suppl 1):S11-18. doi:10.1016/s0264-410x(02)00811-3.
  9. Kaiser R. Tick-borne encephalitis. Infect Dis Clin North Am. 2008;22(3):561-575. doi:10.1016/j.idc.2008.03.013.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION AND INDICATION

Important Safety Information
  • TicoVac™ should not be given to anyone with a history of a severe allergic reaction after a previous dose of TicoVac™. 
  • TicoVac™ may not protect all individuals against TBE.
  • Some individuals with weakened immune systems may have a reduced immune response.
  • TicoVac™ contains albumin, a derivative of human blood. Based on effective donor screening and product manufacturing processes, it carries an extremely remote risk for transmission of viral diseases.
  • The most common adverse reactions in subjects 1 through 15 years of age who received TicoVac™ were local tenderness, local pain, headache, fever, and restlessness.
  • The most common adverse reactions in subjects 16 through 65 years of age who received TicoVac™ were local tenderness, local pain, fatigue, headache, and muscle pain.
  • Tell your healthcare provider if you are pregnant, or plan to become pregnant.
  • Ask your healthcare provider about the risks and benefits for TicoVac™. Only a healthcare provider can decide if TicoVac™ is right for you.
Indication

TicoVac™ is a vaccine indicated for active immunization to prevent tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) and is approved for use in individuals 1 year of age and older.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of vaccines to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit http://www.vaers.hhs.gov or call 1-800-822-7967.

Patients should always ask their healthcare providers for medical advice about adverse events. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of vaccines to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit http://www.vaers.hhs.gov or call 1-800-822-7967.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION AND INDICATION

Important Safety Information
  • TicoVac™ should not be given to anyone with a history of a severe allergic reaction after a previous dose of TicoVac™. 
  • TicoVac™ may not protect all individuals against TBE.
  • Some individuals with weakened immune systems may have a reduced immune response.
  • TicoVac™ contains albumin, a derivative of human blood. Based on effective donor screening and product manufacturing processes, it carries an extremely remote risk for transmission of viral diseases.
  • The most common adverse reactions in subjects 1 through 15 years of age who received TicoVac™ were local tenderness, local pain, headache, fever, and restlessness.
  • The most common adverse reactions in subjects 16 through 65 years of age who received TicoVac™ were local tenderness, local pain, fatigue, headache, and muscle pain.
  • Tell your healthcare provider if you are pregnant, or plan to become pregnant.
  • Ask your healthcare provider about the risks and benefits for TicoVac™. Only a healthcare provider can decide if TicoVac™ is right for you.
Indication

TicoVac™ is a vaccine indicated for active immunization to prevent tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) and is approved for use in individuals 1 year of age and older.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of vaccines to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit http://www.vaers.hhs.gov or call 1-800-822-7967.

Patients should always ask their healthcare providers for medical advice about adverse events. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of vaccines to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit http://www.vaers.hhs.gov or call 1-800-822-7967.

This site is intended only for U.S. residents. The products discussed in this site may have different product labeling in different countries.

The information provided is for educational purposes only and is not intended to replace discussions with a healthcare provider.

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  • May 2022
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