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Tick-Borne
If your family travels with you overseas to Europe or Asia, help to keep them safe from Tick-Borne Encephalitis (TBE).

Though rare, TBE is a potentially devastating viral disease, which is caused by a single tick bite that has the TBE virus.1 There is no cure for TBE, only management of symptoms.2,3 Vaccination can help prevent TBE for individuals spending time in Europe and Asia.1,2​​​​​​​
​​​​​
Learn more about prevention and the importance of vaccination for military dependents and spouses.
Contact a physician at your Military Treatment Facility for more information.

Key Facts

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0

countries* affected throughout 
​​​​​​​Europe and Asia2,4
country

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confirmed cases reported
​​​​​​​ in Europe and Asia in 20202
report

0

-

0

%

suffering from severe disease
develop long-term
​​​​​​​consequences5
tick

What is Tick-Borne Encephalitis?​​​​​​​

Tick-borne encephalitis is a rare infection of the brain and spine.1 Transmission of the TBE virus to humans most commonly occurs from the bite of an infected tick.2 Symptoms typically appear in two phases and can be mistaken initially for a mild flu-like illness.4,6 The most common symptoms in the first phase are fever, fatigue, headache, and muscle pain.6 Those that progress to the second phase may experience symptoms similar to other causes of inflammation of the brain and spine or meningitis.6
​​​​​​
Ticks infected with the TBE virus are not confined to one country, with reports of infected ticks from across Europe to Asia.7,8 TBE has been reported in more than 30 countries throughout Europe and Asia.2,4​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​
what-is-tbe

Consequences of Infection

Tick-borne encephalitis can result in long-term consequences including disability, paralysis, and death.1,9 Among adults infected with the European subtype, two-thirds will only experience phase one.5 After about 8 days of no symptoms, 20-30% of patients will experience a second phase.5 Of those that experience both phases, between 30-60% will have long-term consequences.5 In rare cases and depending on the subtype of infection, death may occur.5​​​​​​​
Who Can Be Affected?
Anyone traveling to a country* and participating in high-risk activities can be affected by TBE.4 Most TBE virus infections result from tick bites acquired in forested areas through activities such as camping, hiking, fishing, bicycling, collecting mushrooms, berries, or flowers, and outdoor occupations such as forestry or military training.4 The risk is negligible for people who remain in urban or unforested areas and who do not consume unpasteurized dairy products.4 Military personnel and their families stationed overseas or visiting endemic areas may be at risk.2,4
Affected
Who Should Get Vaccinated?
According to the World Health Organization, vaccination is considered the most effective prevention measure for TBE.10

Military personnel deployed to endemic areas should consider receiving vaccinations. Spouses and military dependents traveling to endemic areas are to receive vaccination before departure to help ensure protection against TBE infection.

​​​​​​​You and your families should consider prevention options including vaccination if spending time outdoors in wooded or grassy areas, whether in an urban or rural area during TBE virus transmission season, or engaging in activities that will expose them to ticks.1,4​​​​​​​

​​​​​​​This includes:
  • Traveling during warmer months when ticks are more active typically from April through November.4
  • Spending a substantial amount of time outdoors in wooded or grassy areas.4
  • Participating in outdoor activities, such as camping, hiking, fishing, bicycling, collecting mushrooms, berries, or flowers, and outdoor occupations such as forestry or military training.4
What You Should Know About The TicoVacTM Vaccine
TicoVac™ is a vaccine indicated for active immunization to prevent a disease caused by the TBE virus, approved for use in individuals one year of age and older.3 The primary TicoVacTM series should be completed at least 1 week prior to potential exposure to TBE.3

​​​​​​​TicoVacTM follows a 3-dose schedule.3 The entire primary vaccination schedule can be completed in as few as 6 months for all individuals.3

​​​​​​​TicoVacTM has an established safety and tolerability profile for both children and adults.The Pfizer TBE vaccine has been used for over 45 years outside of the US.11,12​​​​​​​ The most common side effects for individuals 1 through 15 years of age are local tenderness, local pain, headache, fever, and restlessness.3 For individuals 16 through 65 years of age, the most common side effects are local tenderness, local pain, fatigue, headache, and muscle pain.3
​​​​​
Contact a physician at your Military Treatment Facility for more information.
Child
Dosing Schedule3
​​​​​​​​
0.25mL dose
Child
Dosing Schedule3
0.25mL dose
Dose 1
Dose 2
1 to 3 months after 
the first dose
Dose 3
5 to 12 months after
the second dose
Adult 
​​​​​​​Dosing Schedule3
0.5mL dose
Adult 
Dosing Schedule3
0.5mL dose
Dose 1
Dose 2
14 days to 3 months
after the first dose
Dose 3
5 to 12 months after
the second dose
If you’re an active-duty family member traveling with your sponsor on PCS orders or on official travel, you may be eligible for vaccine reimbursement.
CONTACT A TRICARE REPRESENTATIVE
​​​​​​​* Albania, Austria, Belarus, Bosnia and Herzegovina, China, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, Mongolia, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Korea, Sweden, Switzerland, Ukraine.

TicoVac™ Resources

TicoVac Consumer BrochureTicoVac Consumer Brochure

TicoVac™
Consumer
Brochure

Download
Vaccines by CountryVaccines by Country

CDC - TBE Virus
Risk ​​​​​​​Information 
​​​​​​​by Country

Visit
CDC ACIP ArticleCDC ACIP Article

CDC ACIP Article

Visit

How to Help
Prevent
​​​​​​​TBE Video

View

What should you do
if bitten by a tick? 
Video

View
References
  1. Lindquist L, Vapalahti O. Tick-borne encephalitis. Lancet. 2008;371(9627):1861-1871.
  2. Dobler G, Erber W, Bröker M, Schmitt HJ, eds. The TBE Book. 4th ed. Global Health Press; 2021.
  3. TicoVacTM (Tick-Borne Encephalitis Vaccine). Prescribing Information. New York, NY: Pfizer Inc. 2021.
  4. Fischer M, Gould CV, Rollin PE. Tickborne Encephalitis. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC Yellow Book 2020: Health Information for International Travel. New York: Oxford University Press; 2017. Chapter 4. Accessed February 4, 2022. https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/yellowbook/2020/travel-related-infectious-diseases/tickborne-encephalitis
  5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) Factsheet. Accessed February 4, 2022. https://www.cdc.gov/vhf/tbe/resources/TBE-FactSheet.pdf
  6. Kaiser R. Tick-borne encephalitis. Infect Dis Clin North Am. 2008;22(3):561-575.
  7. Bogovic P, Strle F. Tick-borne encephalitis: A review of epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and management. World J Clin 
    Cases
    . 2015;3(5):430-441.
  8. European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. Tick-borne encephalitis - Annual epidemiological report for 2018. Accessed 
    February 4, 2022. https://www.ecdc.europa.eu/en/publications-data/tick-borne-encephalitis-annual-epidemiological-report-2018
  9. European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. Factsheet about tick-borne encephalitis (TBE). Accessed February 4, 2022. 
    https://www.ecdc.europa.eu/en/tick-borne-encephalitis/facts/factsheet
  10. World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe, European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. Fact sheet - Tick - borne encephalitis in Europe. Accessed February 4, 2022. https://www.euro.who.int/en/about-us/whd/past-themes-of-world-health-day/2014-vector-borne-diseases/fact-sheets-world-health-day-2014-vector-borne-diseases/fact-sheet-tick-borne-encephalitis-in-europe
  11. Barrett PN, Schober-Bendixen S, Ehrlich HJ. History of TBE vaccines. Vaccine. 2003;21 (suppl 1):S41-S49. 
  12. Data on file. Pfizer Inc. 2017.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION AND INDICATION

Important Safety Information
  • TicoVac™ should not be given to anyone with a history of a severe allergic reaction after a previous dose of TicoVac™. 
  • TicoVac™ may not protect all individuals against TBE.
  • Some individuals with weakened immune systems may have a reduced immune response.
  • TicoVac™ contains albumin, a derivative of human blood. Based on effective donor screening and product manufacturing processes, it carries an extremely remote risk for transmission of viral diseases.
  • The most common adverse reactions in subjects 1 through 15 years of age who received TicoVac™ were local tenderness, local pain, headache, fever, and restlessness.
  • The most common adverse reactions in subjects 16 through 65 years of age who received TicoVac™ were local tenderness, local pain, fatigue, headache, and muscle pain.
  • Tell your healthcare provider if you are pregnant, or plan to become pregnant.
  • Ask your healthcare provider about the risks and benefits for TicoVac™. Only a healthcare provider can decide if TicoVac™ is right for you.
Indication

TicoVac™ is a vaccine indicated for active immunization to prevent tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) and is approved for use in individuals 1 year of age and older.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of vaccines to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit http://www.vaers.hhs.gov or call 1-800-822-7967.

Patients should always ask their healthcare providers for medical advice about adverse events. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of vaccines to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit http://www.vaers.hhs.gov or call 1-800-822-7967.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION AND INDICATION

Important Safety Information
  • TicoVac™ should not be given to anyone with a history of a severe allergic reaction after a previous dose of TicoVac™. 
  • TicoVac™ may not protect all individuals against TBE.
  • Some individuals with weakened immune systems may have a reduced immune response.
  • TicoVac™ contains albumin, a derivative of human blood. Based on effective donor screening and product manufacturing processes, it carries an extremely remote risk for transmission of viral diseases.
  • The most common adverse reactions in subjects 1 through 15 years of age who received TicoVac™ were local tenderness, local pain, headache, fever, and restlessness.
  • The most common adverse reactions in subjects 16 through 65 years of age who received TicoVac™ were local tenderness, local pain, fatigue, headache, and muscle pain.
  • Tell your healthcare provider if you are pregnant, or plan to become pregnant.
  • Ask your healthcare provider about the risks and benefits for TicoVac™. Only a healthcare provider can decide if TicoVac™ is right for you.
Indication

TicoVac™ is a vaccine indicated for active immunization to prevent tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) and is approved for use in individuals 1 year of age and older.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of vaccines to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit http://www.vaers.hhs.gov or call 1-800-822-7967.

Patients should always ask their healthcare providers for medical advice about adverse events. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of vaccines to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit http://www.vaers.hhs.gov or call 1-800-822-7967.

This site is intended only for U.S. residents. The products discussed in this site may have different product labeling in different countries.

The information provided is for educational purposes only and is not intended to replace discussions with a healthcare provider.

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  • May 2022
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